2011 tech priorities: Embrace social media

By , Network World |  Unified Communications, social media

As tempting as it may be to block employee access to social networks and social media sites, it's not a long-term play. IT departments across many industries are under pressure to relax bans and enable access to sites such as Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube.

Social network sites: Block or not?

The pressure is coming from multiple fronts. Sales and marketing teams want to engage and sell to customers through social computing. Users want more freedom to access personal accounts from the workplace. HR teams want to be able to recruit, hire and retain social media-savvy employees, yet they feel hampered by overly restrictive usage policies.

"A lot of businesses, small and large, are moving away from the more restrictive model of blocking social media to a more liberal access model," says Chenxi Wang, vice president and principal analyst at Forrester Research.

The challenge is finding a balance that lets companies use social media to their advantage, keeps employees productive, and ensures the network is safe.

Experts recommend starting with a plan. While many companies have adopted acceptable use policies that address appropriate e-mail and Internet usage, far fewer have adopted procedures related to the use of social media during business hours and while on the corporate network.

"The first thing organizations need to do is to look at extending their existing acceptable use policies to cover all types of Internet communications," says Bradley Anstis, vice president of technical strategy at M86 Security (which recently published a white paper with tips on how to extend usage policies to accommodate social media and networking sites).

Acceptable usage policies should address issues such as the level of access allowed. Not all employees need to post videos to YouTube, for instance, or download Facebook applications. For some groups of employees, read-only access may be prudent. Educating users about the risks associated with social media and providing guidelines related to content sharing are also critical components of an acceptable use policy.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question