Competition, games can bring about enterprise app advances

By Brandon Butler, Network World |  Software, gamification

It's a young and developing market, Wang says, but there are already a handful of companies offering platforms to build competition, reward and game-like features into business applications. Some of the bigger players include Badgeville, Bunchball, Big Door and Gigya, and Wang estimates $100 million has already been invested in the market. More established players in the collaboration and ERP market are evening getting in the game. Salesforce.com has an application named Nitro, which was developed by Bunchball and incorporates game mechanics into tracking sales figures. Its Chatter feature, which is the messaging platform in the software, has leaderboards that show which employees are most active on the site. Jive Software, a collaboration platform, also has a Bunchball-powered application that involves status levels, badges, team-based goals and competitions.

Early adopters of game applications have been across a variety of industries, from human resources to marketing and sales, Wang says. The idea can be used for both customer-facing programs that build a company's brand or encourage potential customers to use a business's product or service, or for internal collaboration use, such as in the Mutual Fun program. On the technology side, Wang says the requirements are fairly simple, ranging anywhere from installing a program that runs either on-premise or in a cloud-based software as a service model, or building customized applications using one of the platforms on the market already.

There are some skeptics, Wang admits, to the idea of bringing "Monopoly"-like fun and games to an enterprise setting. But Wang says fundamentally gamification of the enterprise is about taking a new approach to solving an old problem: It's a way of encouraging employees and customers to engage with the business. The difference today, he says, is there are tools to automate the process and track its success. Like with the consumerization of other IT functions, such as the trend of employees bringing their own devices to work or using their personally preferred applications, businesses are trying to find ways to incorporate these functions into business processes and applications for the benefit of the business.

Network World staff writer Brandon Butler covers cloud computing and social collaboration. He can be reached at BButler@nww.com and found on Twitter at @BButlerNWW.

Read more about lans and routers in Network World's LANs & Routers section.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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