Avaya doubling down on communications outsourcing

By Brandon Butler, Network World |  Unified Communications, Avaya

Since publicly launching a communications outsourcing division earlier this year, Avaya says it has seen strong customer adoption, which is why the company is looking to expand its service to smaller and mid-sized businesses.

A combination of increasing complexity of contact center and communications technology within the enterprise, combined with the ability to outsource the management of those functions to third parties have been driving factors in customer adoption, says Avaya's Ed Nalbandian, vice president of managed services.

In February Avaya launched a managed hosted communications service. By the end of this year Avaya hopes to roll out pre-packaged versions of the managed or cloud-based communications outsourcing product line, as well as an ability to manage communications systems from other third-party vendors, including such installations from Avaya's leading competitors, Cisco and Siemens.

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Managers of communications systems of midsize and large enterprises are getting slammed with an ever-increasing complexity of systems to support, multiple vendors being used in the organization and increasing demands by users, says Frost & Sullivan UC and Collaboration analyst Elka Popova. This is leading to organizations warming to the idea of outsourcing their UC and communication work to either managed hosted or, more recently, cloud-based services. "IT staffs are overwhelmed," she says. "They need relief but they're not ready to fully outsource management of the systems. There is too much investment in their own equipment, or it's just not the right time in the life cycle of the equipment."

Vendors, she says, are coming up with new offerings tailored to customer needs and Avaya is one of the biggest players, given its own market share, combined with the customers it gained from its 2009 acquisition of Nortel.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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