Twitter's downloadable archive: A hands-on tour

If you've wanted your entire tweeting life available anytime anywhere, here's how to get started

By Ian Paul, PC World |  Unified Communications, Twitter

The more interesting way to view your tweets is using the JSON format, which includes a browser-based interface to check out your tweet archive in the default browser on your PC.

To get started with the JSON version double-click the index.html file that came with your Twitter archive. Your default browser should open automatically, displaying your tweet archive in a two-column format that mimics the Twitter.com interface.

The upper right corner includes a box for composing a new tweet and a search box if you're looking for a specific tweet. On the left is a Twitter icon and your @username that takes you back to your most recent month in the archive.

The main viewing area is organized by month and year with a header at the top showing the current month you're looking at and the number of tweets you sent out during that time. You can either move between months by clicking the arrows at the top of the page, or you can navigate to a specific month and year using the timeline column on the right.

Overall, Twitter's archival feature is nicely laid out and even includes support for Twitter cards, the new feature that lets you view photos and other media inside your tweet stream. The downside, however, is that you can only view photos if you have an Internet connection. Images were not included in the archive download in my tests. Your archive also includes any tweets by others that you have retweeted. To view conversations, however, you'll have to use the online version of Twitter by selecting the "View on Twitter" link at the bottom of each tweet since your archive includes only your tweets and retweets.

Twitter says it is rolling its archive retrieval feature out slowly. It is currently available for users with English language Twitter accounts. Twitter says the new feature will roll out to all users in the coming weeks and months.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Unified CommunicationsWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question