Facebook's new 'Graph Search' could be social game changer

Social network unleashes data trove behind its 1B worldwide users

By , Computerworld |  Unified Communications, Facebook, Graph Search

Facebook today took the wraps off a new search tool that could be a game changer for social networking, according to one analyst.

Basically, Facebook is unleashing the collective knowledge and opinions of its one billion users around the world.

"Facebook Graph Search has the potential to really change the game over time," said Dan Olds, an analyst with The Gabriel Consulting Group. "The power of Graph Search comes from Facebook's sheer size. The more data there is to search and map, the more valuable the results. It can make Facebook a much more valuable tool."

Earlier today, Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg took to the stage at the company's Menlo Park, Calif. offices for a press event that had been preceded by nearly a week of increasing speculation about the company's plans. While most rumors had the company prepping a smartphone or new mobile strategy, Zuckerberg said its focus is on search.

So far, there have been two major pillars of Facebook, the Newsfeed and Timeline, Zuckerberg told about 150 reporters at the event. Now Facebook is adding a third pillar: Graph Search.

The feature, which will appear as a bigger search bar at the top of each page, is designed offer up an answer after combing through Facebook's own massive store of user information.

Want to find a great seafood restaurant in San Francisco, for example? Graph Search will find out what restaurants your friends, and even their friends, have tried and liked.

If two people ask the same question, they're very likely to get different results because the results will be based on their individual set of friends and contacts.

Facebook has a massive collection of information about what restaurants, sneakers, appliances and bicycles its users have tried. It also has a similar amount of data on who has attended a certain college and now works at a certain company in a particular city.

Looking for a locally owned bookstore in Seattle? Looking for an old classmate in Maine? What's the best peanut butter or hybrid car?

Facebook is hoping you'll search for the answer on its site.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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