How gamification reshapes corporate training

By Lauren Brousell , CIO |  Unified Communications, gamification, training

Many companies have a hard time getting employees to attend corporate training. Workers are often reluctant because it means taking time away from the office and possibly incurring high travel expenses. With corporate training budgets currently in recovery mode after the toll the recession took, many companies are looking to see the ROI before buying in to training.

In hopes of making training more accessible for employees, Deloitte put its course catalog, Deloitte Leadership Academy, online. The catalog includes a variety of courses and webinars from Harvard Business School to Melbourne University in Australia.

The challenge was getting nearly 200,000 Deloitte employees and more than 50 client companies to log on, take courses and continue the practice of corporate training.

Deloitte Leadership Academy focuses on leadership training classes such as managing change, leading teams and managing complex situations. Because the target group for these classes have schedules with little time to spare, the classes needed to be designed to be quick and easy to take, says Frank Farrall, lead partner at Deloitte Digital. "[The classes are] meant to be [something] you can digest in 10 minutes to an hour while you are on the move," he says.

Deloitte Leadership Academy adds gamification to corporate training.

Deloitte added videos and downloadable content to the courses in order to make them easier to absorb. But it was going to take more than that to give employees more incentive to take part--it was going to take something like adding fun.

A Vistit to Badgeville

In early 2012, Farrall called on Badgeville to add gamification functionality to Deloitte's course portal so participants could earn points and badges based on the number of courses completed. Every time an employee completes a course it is added to his or her total number of points and badges. Employees are ranked based on these totals, and the top earners are rewarded with coveted seats on the leader board.

[ Related: For CIOs, the Games Are Just Beginning ]

Farrall says he thought gamification could be the thing to "drive stickiness" to the learning portal. "It's meant to incentivize you from a peer-comparison point," he says. "Any time you put a leader board up, the increase in activity is dramatic and noticeable."


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Ask a Question