Lawmakers introduce bill to rein in NSA telephone records program

The legislation would end the bulk collection of U.S. telephone records, sponsors say

By , IDG News Service |  Unified Communications

A bipartisan group of more than 85 lawmakers has introduced legislation to end the U.S. National Security Agency's broad collection of U.S. telephone records by imposing new restrictions on who the agency can target.

The USA Freedom Act, cosponsored by 16 senators and more than 70 representatives, would require the NSA to show the records it seeks to collect are related to a foreign power, a suspected agent of a foreign power or a person in contact with a suspected agent. The bill, introduced Tuesday, would require the NSA to get court orders to search U.S. residents' communications obtained without individualized warrants.

Sponsors of the bill include Senator Patrick Leahy, a Vermont Democrat and chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Representative Jim Sensenbrenner, a Wisconsin Republican, and main author of the Patriot Act of 2001, the law the NSA points to as authority for the bulk telephone records collection program.

Government surveillance programs "are far broader than the American people previously understood," Leahy said in a statement. "It is time for serious and meaningful reforms so we can restore confidence in our intelligence community."

More limited proposals to add transparency and oversight to the NSA process, expected soon from the agency's allies in Congress, are "not enough," he added.

Sensenbrenner defended the original Patriot Act, passed weeks after terrorists attacked the U.S. on September 11, 2001, by saying the law has helped to keep the U.S. safe. "But somewhere along the way, the balance between security and privacy was lost," he said in a statement. "It's now time for the judiciary committees to again come together in a bipartisan fashion to ensure the law is properly interpreted, past abuses are not repeated and American liberties are protected."

The bill would also sunset the FISA Amendments Act -- the law that the NSA has used as authority to conduct mass overseas surveillance -- in June 2015, instead of the current December 2017. After the sunset, Congress would have to pass a bill again to reauthorize the overseas surveillance programs under the law.

The bill would create a new office of special advocate to argue in favor of privacy interests at the U.S. Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, that court that reviews and approves the NSA surveillance requests, and it would allow Internet and telecom companies to report on the number of surveillance requests they receive from the U.S. government. Those companies are currently barred from disclosing that information.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question