Drones go where humans can't

ITworld | May 27, 2015

The International Drone Expo in Japan drew thousands of visitors. It featured a number of unusual UAVs, from glider-shaped machines that can take off vertically to drones with flashing lights to palm-sized flyers.

Developed by a spinoff of Chiba University, this large drone can fly in environments without GPS signals by navigating autonomously.

The one that flew in Fukushima had a battery platform just like this, which allows it to swap out batteries all by itself.

That way, workers can stay away from the drone when it’s contaminated with radiation.

The Drone Expo drew thousands of visitors. It featured a number of unusual UAVs, from glider-shaped machines that can take off vertically to drones with flashing lights to palm-sized flyers.

Drone maker ProDrone, which produces UAVs for film companies, was exhibiting a scooter with an unusual payload.

The PD-C01 is the kind of three-wheeled vehicle that’s often used for deliveries in Japan. But instead of pizzas, it packs a drone in the back.

The bike itself has a camera on the canopy. The drone is tethered to the back of the unit through a power and data cable that’s about 30 meters long. It can shoot HD video in disaster zones, accident sites and traffic jams.

Japanese security company Secom was showing off the country’s first drone that can photograph and follow intruders.

The sleek, silver device has a high-definition camera and spotlights to shine on would-be thieves.

It can work with a laser-based intruder-detection system attached to the walls of an area being monitored.

When the system detects an unusual person or vehicle, the drone automatically takes off and investigates. It sends video to a Secom security center, which can dispatch guards.

In Makuhari, Tim Hornyak IDG News Service
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