Microsoft promises to turn almost any app into SAAS

Server app virtualization will run on Azure, easing migration to cloud

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That would make it far easier to offload management of server applications to an external data center than would be the case if you had to tweak and customize every app and VM for each potential provider.

Theoretically it would give even the business units that are the primary customers of external cloud services the ability to move secure internal applications to an external service provider, accelerating what is already a dead sprint toward externally managed applications.

Even if it works exactly as advertised, the first version won't work with most applications, anyway. So whether you're worried all your apps will leave home, or hoping you'll be able to use Server App-V to shift them out of their rut, you'll probably have to wait a bit.

In the first edition they have to support these characteristics to work:

  • State persisted to local disk
  • Windows Services
  • IIS Applications
  • Registry
  • COM+/DCOM
  • Text-based Configuration Files
  • WMI Providers
  • SQL Server Reporting Services
  • Local users and groups
  • Java

The first version will specifically not support these apps or attributes:

  • Virtualization of Windows core component (IIS, DHCP, DNS, etc).
  • J2EE Application Servers
  • SQL Server
  • Exchange Server

Kevin Fogarty writes about enterprise IT for ITworld. Follow him on Twitter @KevinFogarty.

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