Is mobile virtualization ready for your business?

By John Brandon, CIO |  Virtualization

Horizon Mobile addresses the trend in IT where more employees are using personal devices at work. Hoofar Razavi, a VMware product manager, says there are too many restrictions put in place for the personal use of smartphone in the enterprise. Yet, the product also makes it safe for employees to conduct "transactional" activities in a secure mode. For example, employees can use their personal device to check Facebook status, but they can switch to the business instance to create expense reports or answer business-sensitive e-mails. This combination of is more fluid to daily work. "Mobile devices might be the only touchpoint employees use to interact with the enterprise," he says.

Interestingly, VMware has offered both Type 1 and Type hypervisors for mobile virtualization. The company started out using only hardware-level virtualization. Razavi says the company recognized the lightening-fast design cycle and time-to-market realities of mobile devices. He says most smartphones are only on the market for about 9-12 months, but it takes about two years for OEMS to develop the phones. That means, hardware-level virtualization will always be running behind the market.

Razavi says the Type 2 hypervisor is well-suited to the current BYOD climate because the apps run as fast as a native hypervisor, the virtual instances can take advantage of new improvements in processor architecture faster, and Type 2 can support new business apps that arise. For now, VMware has announced partnerships with LG and Samsung for the Horizon Mobile client. One of the main differences between Horizon Mobile and Divide: VMware might include their virtual client as a default install, ready to deploy, whereas Divide might be more of an aftermarket add-on.

3. Red Bend Software vLogix Mobile The main advantage to choosing Red Bend vLogix for mobile virtualization, a Type 1 hypervisor, has to do with speed and control. Lori Sylvia, a Red Bend vice president, says the company has worked closely with several device makers and semiconductor companies to make the product a native, hardware-layer component. She says native, driver-level hypervisor provides better performance, better security and tighter integration. That ways, she says, next-gen enterprises devices will be ready for deployment.

One example of this is the new ARM A-15 Cortex processor currently in development. The processor supports native level mobile virtualization. With this chip, IT can create a secure enterprise domain for the phone that is used to deploy mobile OS for business. IT becomes like a service provider for the business platform, choosing the exact drivers, firmware, apps, and security. Red Bend is already familiar with this deployment model, since they provide the framework for many over-the-air firmware updates used by most major smartphone companies, including Samsung and Motorola.


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Spotlight on ...
Online Training

    Upgrade your skills and earn higher pay

    Readers to share their best tips for maximizing training dollars and getting the most out self-directed learning. Here’s what they said.

     

    Learn more

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness