Dell, EMC, Cisco tackle BYOD with desktop virtualization

By Rob Enderle, CIO |  Consumerization of IT, BYOD, desktop virtualization

It just so happens that virtualized desktops need low latency, too. In this case, it's to provide the user experience demanded by the market. The end result is a near-perfect storm of storage and servers, all made possible by a unique partnership. I talked to EMC and Cisco about their VDI offering a couple of weeks ago; the video is available here. Overall, the solution seems well positioned to addresses the BYOD trend.

Dell Taking End-to-End Approach

While EMC leads in partnerships, Dell leads in the more traditional, end-to-end approach of acquisitions. In addition, because Dell is a desktop vendor, it recognizes that a critical shortcoming of thin client solutions, such as the old Sun Ray 1, is inadequate graphics performance.

This strategy is wrapped with Dell services, through its acquisition of Perot Systems, and has within it a variety of management layers provided by various other Dell acquisitions. Collectively, Dell better addresses the more traditional areas for thin clients-call centers, shared employees or guest use-because the whole package has been designed with the familiar fixed-client architecture in mind.

As a result, Dell has developed a layered solution that includes zero clients from its recent Wyse Technology acquisition-zero clients, unlike thin clients, don't run any native code-as well as servers that use NVIDIA graphics components to pump up the client-side graphics performance. Dell has also shifted its focus at a corporate level to the midmarket, where larger firms have historically suffered. Overall, its solution offers advantages in its end-to-end coverage and midmarket focus.

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Add to this Dell's lines of traditional PCs-the company is making a big Windows 8 splash-and Dell is richer than most companies. It offers a depth of graphics performance and a breadth of clients for companies making the transition between traditional desktops and virtualized desktops. Supporting Apple products likely won't be a leading strength, given that Apple and Dell are competitors, so Dell will probably position its Windows 8 tablets against iPads for its recommended deployments.


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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