5 excellent uses of Windows 8 Hyper-V

Windows 8's bare-metal virtualization layer is a great way to create an app sandbox, run a test machine, launch a VHD appliance, and more

By Serdar Yegulalp, InfoWorld |  Virtualization, Hyper-V, Microsoft

Getting started with Client Hyper-VWhat exactly can be done with Client Hyper-V? In fact, there are several ways you put Client Hyper-V to work, ranging from reproducing functionality found in earlier versions of Windows to running operating systems that aren't Windows at all. I'll explore five of the most useful options in this article.

Before we dive in and start provisioning VHDs, Client Hyper-V has a few system requirements and behavioral restrictions you should be aware of. First, Client Hyper-V has stringent hardware requirements. Not every PC will be able to run it. You need a 64-bit processor that can support Second Level Address Translation (SLAT). You also need at least 4GB of RAM. If you're in doubt about your PC, you can run a utility like Coreinfo to find out if SLAT is supported on your machine. Many notebook-edition CPUs do not support SLAT, but most desktop processors do. If you're running the most recent generation of Intel or AMD processors, then you're golden.

Second, Client Hyper-V is not installed by default in Windows 8. In fact, the setup process for Client Hyper-V is a convenient way to determine if the computer you're using can support it in the first place. Search for "features" in the Settings section of Windows 8 Search, and launch "Turn Windows features on or off." There, under Hyper-V, select Hyper-V Platform (and enable all the other management tools). If you don't have the right kind of hardware or if the hardware properties you need are disabled in BIOS, you'll get a warning to that effect.

Finally, when running any instance of an operating system, always make sure you have the right to do so, per the licensing agreements for the software. Copies of Windows must be licensed for use in virtual machines as well as physical ones. The host instance of Windows 8 doesn't automatically give you the right to run guest instances of any version of Windows.

If Client Hyper-V isn't supported on your hardware, you'll be alerted when you attempt to install the components. The system on the left is good to go; the system on the right lacks a compatible CPU.

Use Windows 8 Hyper-V to virtualize Windows XP (or another earlier version of Windows) Much to Microsoft's ongoing chagrin, Windows XP has become The OS That Just Won't Die. Many cling to it because it runs with minimal resources. Others stick with it because they have applications or hardware that work with it and nothing else -- all this in the face of a ticking clock to discontinue its support forever!


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
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