Your Kids and Your PCs: Tips for Peaceful Coexistence

By Bill Snyder, CIO |  Virtualization

Having kids is a blessing. But having kids mess with your PC can be, well, a curse. If they're little, you've got to worry about things like Playdough in the DVD drive, spilled milk on the keyboard and jam on the mouse. If they're older, your worries get more complex: How to keep them from reading and maybe even deleting your files, messing up system settings-and of course, how to regulate their Web surfing.

A number of excellent solutions can help solve nearly all of those problems, saving you money, aggravation and anxiety.

Home PC's New Best Friend: Virtual Machines If you've been parenting for any length time, you've probably figured out that injunctions to do this and not do that often fall on deliberately deaf ears. Indeed, telling a kid not to do something automatically makes it all the more interesting. So, rather than giving your children a long list of computer dos and don'ts, why not just make it impossible for them to do the things you don't want them to do?

That's the beauty of a virtual machine. By setting it up correctly, the rules take care of themselves. A file, application or setting that isn't visible can't be accessed. Simply put, a virtual machine is like an opaque bubble inside your PC or Mac. From the user's point of view, it is the computer.

There are a number of ways to set up a virtual machine, starting with the popular, free VMware Player and the popular choices for Mac users from Parallels . You can also check out Sun Microsystems (now part of Oracle) VirtualBox (an open source app that works across multiple OS platforms) and Microsoft's Virtual PC (for Windows PCs), both free.

Keep in mind that you're going to run into trouble running virtual machines on physical machines with skimpy amounts of memory. Some of the products have small requirements quirks, so check. (For instance, for the latest version of Virtual PC, which runs on Windows 7, you need a processor capable of hardware-assisted virtualization with AMD-V, Intel VT or VIA VT turned on in the BIOS. Don't worry. Microsoft has a free tool that will tell you if your microprocessor is equipped with this arcane stuff. Most recently purchased PCs support virtualization. ) You will need a licensed copy of the operating system you want to install in the virtual machine.

Setting up the virtual machine isn't a lot more complicated than installing an operating system. The programs will walk you through installation, and most importantly give you options that determine what the virtual machine can and can't do.


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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