Add to Win8: Ability to tell when wheels come off, not just when tires are fully inflated.

Even Win7's extensive self-help tools report everything is fine when it's not

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Lady Slippers are an older variety that came about the same way, apparently from female hikers who tended to plummet head-first rather than the other way around; they're beautiful flowers, despite the tragic story of their origin.

(It's best to give all these varieties plenty of room if you encounter them in the wild. They're listed as Threatening Species, rather than Threatened, but it's best not to take any chances, anyway.)

If Microsoft is treating the critical, covert systemic faults of its operating system and the various modules that have been duct-taped to it over the years as a historical record that should be preserved in its natural environment rather than in some museum of Fixed Operating-System Bugs, that's fine.

Microsoft certainly deserves to be cut some slack.

Especially considering the contributions it has made to software bugs, innovative operational flaws, enhancements to the appearance and ease of use of a user interface that actually make the software harder to use (I forgot to mention the other day that Microsoft is putting the Ribbon command-line in Windows 8 in order to conceal all the commands you've already leaned and force you to take more care with your work my increasing the time you spend on it by 20 percent.

On the other hand, if it's going to leave those giant post-holes in the operating system, maybe is should warn us.

It's not a problem that Microsoft move gradually toward Metro and other code-execution frameworks, to give users time to adapt and so as not to shock or inconvenience the legions of ActiveX, .NET and GiantHoleinGround developers it was working feverishly to recruit right up to the moment it announced it would be using a different app dev approach entirely,

I'd just prefer that, if it's going to continue promising to at least help identify your problem using Outlook Diagnostics , ActiveX tools, scanners, troubleshooters, registry fixers profile restructurers and other tools.

Not to mention hundreds of support forum responses from Microsoft staffers saying only "Hi, check this KB article; it should fix your issue," with a link to one of thousands of unreadable KnowledgeBase articles that admit the existence of a problem but do nothing to help fix it.

It's usually silly, not to mention statistically invalid, to write about a problem in some vendor's software simply because it didn't work correctly for you during one attempt at installation.

Blogs or articles in which the writer talks only about his or her PC problems rarely offer much really useful advice, and are almost always self-indulgent in allowing the writer to complain about his or her own personal frustrations.

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