Windows 8 updates are missing one crucial improvement

Future updates to Windows 8 will require fewer reboots, but one more big change would be even better.

By Joseph Fieber, PC World |  Windows, Microsoft, windows 8

Microsoft says Windows 8 will make its OS updates less annoying, limiting restarts to once a month. But system reboots are still often necessary--namely when a file that needs updating is open at the time.

Updates offer a tenuous trade-off, providing more security and reliability, but forcing you to spend time to reboot--or worse yet, causing you to lose work during an automatic reboot. The best way to prevent the problems is to eliminate the need for a restart at all. However, Microsoft says Windows 8 will t least boot faster.

Three Things That Will Help

1. SSDs

Solid-state drives (SSDs) are generally twice as fast as hard disk drives (HDDs) at transferring data. Many high-end laptops and ultraportable computers are now using SSDs, and as the prices drop, they will become more common in mid and low-end laptops and desktops as well, so it's likely to be an option on many Windows 8 computers.

2. UEFI

Most current PCs use BIOS as the system to initiate the start of your computer. BIOS has been around for 25 years, and can often take 10 to 15 seconds before launching Windows and telling it about your hardware. Universal Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) is the modern version of this, with even more features, and more importantly, in only a few seconds, largely due to the ability to be optimized for the hardware it runs on. Windows 8 works with UEFI and will use it for its "Secure Booting" feature.

3. Boot Code

Windows 8 makes some changes to improve startup or reboot time. Initializing the device drivers in parallel instead of one after the other is one improvement. Another is "Trigger Start Services" which only loads services if and when they are needed, instead of loading most of them at startup. It also delays reboots if unsaved data is detected.

What's Still Needed


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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