Clock is ticking on XP -- time to start OS migration

Windows XP is an awesome operating system that has served businesses well for a decade, but it's time is coming to an end

By , PC World |  Windows, Windows XP

Tick, tick, tick, tick. That sound you hear is the clock winding down on the life of the Windows XP operating system. As of today, you have less than two years left until Microsoft will no longer support the OS. Two years may sound like a long time, but if you haven't even begun to consider migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7, the pressure is on.

Your Windows XP systems will still work the same as they have for the last decade. But, as of April 8, 2014 Microsoft will no longer support the operating system, or provide patches or security updates. So, from that point forward the OS will become increasingly unstable and insecure. Essentially, you'll be on your own.

With time winding down on Windows XP and Office 2003, software and hardware vendors may already jump ship. As time goes on, more and more new products will not include support for Windows XP or Office 2003, and third-party vendors will be less likely to support or update older products designed for these legacy platforms.

By the way, Office 2003 is on its deathbed as well. For larger companies, the process of testing and deploying a new desktop operating system to hundreds or thousands of users is a meticulous process that takes months, or even years.

On a site dedicated to the end of support for Windows XP and Office 2003, Microsoft states, "Based on historical customer deployment data, the average enterprise deployment can take 18 to 32 months from business case through full deployment." Assuming that is accurate, those organizations that fall in the 24 to 32 month range for full deployment are already behind the proverbial 8-ball.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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