5 things Microsoft doesn't want you to know

By Jonathan Hassell, CIO |  Windows, Apple, cloud computing

I found it amazing that Visual Studio Express, which historically has been able to create most applications-albeit without the bells, whistles and accoutrements that beefed-up Visual Studio versions have had- was going to be restricted to developing only Metro-style apps for Windows 8, Windows RT (the tablet) and, presumably, Windows Phone 7.5 and whatever the next version will be called.

The message, regardless of the decision's reversal? Please write apps for our consumer products, not your next line-of-business custom program. This move would have been a huge swing. Microsoft has always been about making it as easy and as fast as possible to develop for Windows in any way, shape or form. Think back to Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer and his hooting and hollering about "developers, developers, developers!"

The Visual Studio Express decision is such antipattern that it had to have been driven from the Windows division, headed by Steven Sinofsky. It seems that the Developer Division, where all the developer tools come from, basically had to fall in line. Ultimately, the Windows client rules the roost at Microsoft these days-and the results aren't always pretty.

4. Windows 7 Is a Solid, Compelling Upgrade Over Windows XP.

Windows XP support and security updates are drying up very soon. Many enterprises, knowing where they are in the Microsoft published support lifecycle, have Windows 7 hardware and software refresh programs underway. Having skipped Vista, these companies are standardizing on Windows 7, and they won't be in the market for another desktop upgrade for at least three to four years. ( Going from Windows XP to Windows 8 is not recommended.) Furthermore, few companies will consider hybrid deployments of Windows 7 and Windows 8, since that's a support nightmare. In short, enterprises will probably pass on Windows 8.


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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