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By Alex Wawro, PC World |  Hardware, HDTV, PCs

It can be terribly frustrating to run a cable from a good HDTV to a PC graphics board and get skewed proportions, faded colors, and slightly blurry images.

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Your HDTV might not perform well as a monitor for several reasons. First, many HDTVs aren't designed to display fine details (such as text and lines) at close distances, but to display smooth motion and vibrant colors from distances of up to 5 feet away. Some HDTVs are configurable for use as PC monitors, however, so check to see whether your HDTV has an 'Alternate Monitor' display setting, or something similar.

Second, the native resolution of your HDTV may not match your Windows desktop as configured. For example, if you hook up a 42-inch LG 42LH50 HDTV with a native resolution of 1920 by 1080 (1080p) to a PC running the widescreen version of the same resolution (1920 by 1200), everything on your desktop will look a bit stretched out and weird. For optimal picture quality, you must configure your PC to match your HDTV's native resolution and disable any of your HDTV's features that may interfere with the PC video signal (scaling, overscan, and the like) and thus degrade picture quality.

Third, an older graphics board driver may assume that an HDMI connection must be to a TV, and it may react by underscanning the image from your PC to fit it within the borders of the display, making your Windows desktop look squished on a big 1080p PC monitor. To correct this problem, open the control panel for your graphics board and disable the underscan feature.

Finally, using an analog VGA cable to connect your HDTV to your PC can allow noise or other interference to disrupt the signal coming from your PC, thereby worsening the screen's image quality. For best results, use a short HDMI cable to connect your HDTV and your PC.

What is UEFI, and why should I care?

The Unified Extensible Firmware Interface is a new firmware interface specification that is designed to replace the familiar BIOS interface.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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