Microsoft DirectAccess: The ugly truth

By Keith Schultz, InfoWorld |  Windows

DirectAccess, Microsoft's pairing of Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 for connect-anywhere access, is possibly the best thing Redmond has produced in a long time. Unfortunately for many, it just may be about five years too early.

For those just getting up to speed on some of Windows 7's new features, DirectAccess is a way for Windows 7 clients to securely connect to the corporate network from any location without any type of traditional VPN. It provides an encrypted bidirectional connection between the enterprise domain and the client device prior to the user logging on to the system, allowing admins to manage the remote machine via Group Policy and the like, just as if it were physically connected to the network. The connection is always on, so users don't have to remember to manually launch a VPN client, and their applications, such as Microsoft Outlook and instant messaging, are always in communication with the corporate network.

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From this standpoint, DirectAccess is fantastic. As the network admin, I love that I always have access to the remote device to make sure virus definitions and Windows updates are in place, and that my managed systems are always governed by my domain Group Policy. I also love that I don't have to maintain a bunch of VPN policies, and yet my users can still access e-mail and intranet sites without additional applications. Always on equals no user intervention.

Greater functionality means greater hardware and software requirements. The following list of DirectAccess requirements comes directly from Microsoft TechNet:

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